Tips about Asakusa Station

Asakusa, as the Monzenmachi (temple town) of Sensoji, with the atmosphere of Shitamachi, is showcasing the vitality and prosperity of the past, and welcomes 30 million tourists annually. Its history dates back to the Edo period and it has made remarkable progress. This time, we share the best ways to enjoy Asakusa to the fullest, and a few extra tips!

A Must for the Route to Sensoji

There are many shrines and temples in Asakusa. You can follow the Shichifukujin-meguri (a tour of the Seven Deities of Good Fortune) - if you have a goshuin-cho (a notebook for collecting sacred seals) remember to take it with you as a record of the temples you visited. The starting point is “Sensoji”, the oldest temple in Tokyo.

The huge lantern hung at the Kaminarimon (Thunder Gate) of Sensoji is 3.9m tall with a diameter of 3.3m and weighs 700kg. A photo with a background of the photogenic “Kaminarimon” with its huge lantern is a must! Once entering Sensoji from the “Hozo Gate”, you may cleanse your hands and mouth at the “Chouzusha (purification trough)”, “cover” yourself with the smoke from the “Jyoukouro (incense burner)” and pray for sound health. After praying in the main hall, get yourself an amulet or pick a fortune slip - a lot of fun.

Spot Information

  • Spot name: Sensoji (浅草寺)
  • Address: 2-3-1 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo 111-0032
  • Access: Tokyo Metro Ginza Line: 5-minute walk from Asakusa Station, Toei Subway Asakusa Line: 5-minute walk from Asakusa Station Exit A4

Shopping Highlights Around Sensoji

When you’ve explored the grounds of Sensoji Temple you’ll find there is still plenty more to see in Asakusa. On the route leading up to the temple is the popular shopping streets of Nakamise-dori. This is a great place for souvenirs and snacks, with plenty of street-food options like rice crackers and local candy. If you’re looking for souvenir ideas, be sure to check our guide on what to buy!

Demboin-dori is a small shopping and dining street right beside Sensoji with a more down-to-earth feel. There are many traditional handmade items available as well as affordable local restaurants to try.

To the West of Sensoji’s complex is the unusual and festival-themed shopping street of Nishisando Shopping Street. Here you can learn about the area’s festivals including the Sanja Matsuri, the Tori-no-Ichi Fair and the Samba Carnival as well as try out fun festival activities such as goldfish scooping and a shooting range. The street is covered and perfect for rainy days, as well as being home to a branch of the famous Kagetsudo - known for making giant melon pan, sweet bread rolls with a deliciously crunchy shell.

If you continue West you’ll also find the popular Kappabashi Kitchen Town, a great souvenir spot for chefs and home cooks alike. With everything from Japan’s famous food models to unusual cooking utensils, you can browse to your hearts delight and even take home a high-quality kitchen knife as a life-ling souvenir of your trip.

Want to be Stylish? Try Kimono rental and other Traditional Experiences

Want to be Stylish? Try Kimono rental and other Traditional Experiences

There are shops where the rental of kimono, bags and hair accessories, including the dressing and hair setting, is available from 3000 yen. You can take a ride on a rickshaw to explore the streets, or take a stroll through the Nakamise-dori shopping street as if you are a uptown girl in the Edo period. Let's have a unique experience in Asakusa you’ll always remember! ! If you’re looking for more traditional experiences in Asakusa, consider trying your hand at glass cutting, sweet-making or tea ceremony as well as being a Ninja for the day (or find out where to spot one!).

Spot Information

  • Spot name: Asakusa Kimono Rental “Yae”
  • Address: 6th Floor Quatre Chic 1-16-2 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo 111-0032
  • Access: Tokyo Metro Ginza Line: 3-minute walk from Asakusa Station, Toei Subway Asakusa Line: 3-minute walk from Asakusa Station A4 Exit

Sightseeing Highlights in Asakusa

If you want to learn more about the culture and history of Asakusa, the best place to start is the Asakusa Cultural tourist Information Center. Located across from Asakusa Station, the unusual building was designed by award-wining architect Kengo Kuma, and has multi-lingual staff, video guides and a host of leaflets to help you plan your time in Asakusa.

Some of the highlights in the area include Asakusa Engei Hall, where you can learn about the ancient art of storytelling. Known as Rakugo in Japanese, the art involves a single storyteller regaling the audience with humorous tales. There are also displays of stage magic, including paper-cutting and music which may better suit those with lower Japanese levels. There are also a number of theaters in the area, if you would like to see further performances.

For families, there are some great experiences to be enjoyed in Asakusa, including the popular river cruises and Waterbus. The cruises are beautiful at night while the waterbus takes you along the Sumida river with destinations including Hamarikyu Gardens and Odaiba. They are especially beautiful journeys in the spring when the river is lined with cherry blossom. Hanayashiki is a great family destination in Asakusa. It is a traditional theme park with plenty of attractions and rides for kids and adults.

Just across the river the Tokyo Skytree is an unmissable sightseeing spot in Asakusa. Whether you capture the iconic sight through neighborhood streets or visit it for the views - here are our top spots for seeing the tallest tower in Tokyo. If you enjoy sightseeing but don’t like walking, consider taking the red bus - it features all the best spots in the area.

Try These Gourmet Options in Asakusa: Kagetsudo, Funawa, Imahan…

Try These Gourmet Options in Asakusa: Kagetsudo, Funawa, Imahan…

At Nakamise-dori, which leads from the Kaminarimon to the main hall of Sensoji, there are a few famous street food options which are available only here. These include the Kagetsudo’s freshly baked melon bun which is crispy on the outside but fluffy inside, Funawa’s sweet potato, hand-baked doll cake, fried manju and ice-cream with gold foil. So many snacks are available! As for Japanese food, there are so many kinds that you would need to have more than 3 meals a day to try them all. For example, Sukiyaki from Imahan, Doze-nabe from Iidaya, Soba from Nabikiyabu-soba and sushi from Kibunzushi. If you’re looking to experience the nightlife of Asakusa, the Hoppy Street is the place to go. With dozens of bars and izakaya (Japanese bars with food) it’s known for Hoppy - a cheap, beer-like drink that’s popular as a mixer. The street is also known for stew so be sure to try both. Check out our favourite places for delicious food in Asakusa for more ideas.

Spot Information

  • Spot name: Kagetsudo (花月堂)
  • Address: 6th Floor Quatre Chic 1-16-2 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo 111-0032
  • Access: Tokyo Metro Ginza Line: 2-minute walk from Asakusa Station Exit 1, Toei Subway Asakusa Line: 2-minute walk from Asakusa Station Exit 1

Spot Information

  • Spot name: Funawa Kaminarimon Branch (舟和 雷門店)
  • Address: 1-3-5 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo 111-0032
  • Access: Tokyo Metro Ginza Line: 2-minute walk from Asakusa Station Exit 1, Toei Subway Asakusa Line: 2-minute walk from Asakusa Station Exit 1

Spot information

  • Spot name: Imahan Main Branch (今半本店)
  • Address: 1-19-7 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo 111-0032
  • Access: Tokyo Metro Ginza Line/ Toei Subway Asakusa Like/Tobu Line: 3-minute walk from Asakusa Station

Tips about Asakusa Station

Tips about Asakusa Station

The Ginza Line, the Asakusa Line and the Isesaki Line run through Asakusa Station. The best access to Sensoji is via Ginza Line Exit A4. The station was designed, with Sensoji in mind and was selected as one of the “100 Greatest Stations in Kanto”

What not stay in Asakusa?

Many feel that they only need a day for a trip to Asakusa, however the Kaminarimon evening illimunation is very picturesque. Also, to taste all the gourmet dishes we’ve mentioned, it is worth spending a night in Asakusa. There has been an increase of stylish concept hotels here in recent years. For example, the “Overnight bookstore” BOOK AND BED TOKYO, and BUKA HOSTEL TOKYO, a dormitory-type hostel which encourages communication among travelers - both arevery popular. For more ideas on where to stay in Asakusa, check out our top nine picks and you could even consider a night in a Hello Kitty-themed room!

Spot Information

  • Spot name: BOOK AND BED TOKYO
  • Address: 6th Floor Pagoda Asakusa 2-16-9 Kaminarimon , Taito-ku, Tokyo 111-0034
  • Access: Toei Subway Asakusa Line: 3-minute walk from Asakusa Station Exit 2

Spot information

  • Spot name: BUNKA HOSTEL TOKYO
  • Address: 1-13-5 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo 111-0032
  • Access: 5-minute walk from Tokyo Metro Ginza Line Asakusa Station / Toei Subway Asakusa Line Asakusa Station

What do you think? How about starting your Japan trip from Asakusa where you can pray at the temple for safety during your trip? 

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